OTP code scam

OTP Code Security Mistakes You Should Avoid

Ignorance about how OTP code (one-time PIN or one-time password) works have cost many their hard-earned money. Many have also lost their WhatsApp or Facebook account to scammers for this same reason. The fact is that despite how secure the entrance to your house is, you will end up being robbed if you give the key to it to every stranger you see. The same thing applies to online security. If you give out the information meant for your online account security to a stranger despite how hard your password is to guess and how secure the platform is; then there is a 100% chance you will be hacked. OTP code is one code that whenever you receive it on your phone, then it shows that whoever that requested for it is at the last stage of breaking into your account. That is why it is a costly mistake to give it out to anyone.

Ignorance about how the OTP code (one-time PIN or one-time password) works has cost many their hard-earned money. Many have also lost their WhatsApp or Facebook accounts to scammers for this same reason.

The fact is that despite how secure the entrance to your house is, you will end up being robbed if you give the key to it to every stranger you see.

The same thing applies to online security. If you give out the information meant for your online account security to a stranger, despite how hard your password is to guess and how secure the platform is, then there is a 100% chance you will be hacked.

An OTP code is one code that, whenever you receive it on your phone, shows that whoever requested it is at the last stage of breaking into your account. That is why it is a costly mistake to give it out to anyone.

What is the OTP code?

OTP simply stands for a one-time PIN or one-time password. As the name implies, it is a password or PIN one can use once to access an online account. After that one use or after some minutes without use, the code becomes invalid.

The OTP code is the code you receive when you want to login to an account protected with two-factor authentication.

Some banks also send you an OTP code when you want to withdraw money through your mobile banking or USSD banking or when you want to activate such banking.

An OTP code can be four, five, six, or nine digit long depending on the platform you are receiving it from. Some OTPs also contain letters.

Related Post: How Your WhatsApp Account Get Hacked

Two Security Facts You Should Know About OTP Code

1. Every OTP Code You Received on Your Phone Belongs To You

Never believe the lie scammers tell these days that their code was mistakenly sent to you. Any OTP code you receive on your phone belongs to you and only activate things on accounts linked by your phone number.

Don’t listen to anyone that claims they used your phone number to request their code by mistake. Despite who they are, even if is your friends or family member.

Never send back code delivered to your phone to anyone. Always advise them to request a new code using their correct phone number.

OTP is device-specific. It belongs and is attached to the phone number and device that received and initiated it respectively. Meaning that if you receive it on your phone number, then it is for you alone. It can not belong to anyone else.

So, anything that is activated using it, will be directly connected to your phone number.

Related Post: Things to Do to Avoid Being Easily Hacked Online

2. OTP is Always Your Last Security Gate

What I mean by this is that whenever you receive an OTP code on your phone, it means that whoever requested it is at the last stage of breaking into your account.

This implies that the person may have bypassed your password and is waiting for the code to finish up their login process.

The worst mistake you will make is to send back to anyone the OTP code you received on your phone thinking it belongs to them.

Remember, once they receive this code from you, the next you will be receiving are debit alerts, that is if it is your account they are attacking.

Always remember that whoever was able to request an OTP sent to your phone already has your password or ATM PIN.

Never send back the code you received on your phone to anyone in the name of helping them. Despite who they are to you. Please share this message to everyone dear to you.

Those that tried to help others by sending back their code always ended in premium tears.

Remember, recovering a stolen fund from scammers is always difficult. Share this knowledge to help protect others.

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